Tuesday, May 03, 2011

Top Draftalong # 9 - Assembling the PDF Pattern

Morning all. So. You should hopefully have a pile of paper with sections of the full size pattern printed on each sheet. You should have a scale plan that shows how the whole pattern sheet will look once it's assembled (hold onto this after you've finished as we have plans for this too). We're basically using this as a guide to assemble the pattern. If you've ever used an Epattern then this should all be fairly self explanatory. At the risk of over explaining things though, I took a few stage by stage photos, just in case.  When you compare the scale plan to the individual pattern sheets you'll see that they are numbered in order, from left to right...

Working from the top left hand corner lay out one row at a time, left to right. (1-4, 5-8,9-12 and so on..)
Trim the borders off the image on one of the sheets where they need to butt up against eachother.
You should end up with this sort of arrangement. A trimmed sheet in the centre of 2 sheets that retain the overlap edge...
 Line the sheets up so that the images are as aligned as possible, according to the scale plan....

Use the outline of the pattern piece and the gridlines as a guide. You may need to play around a bit before things line up on all edges...(it won't line up perfectly on every line of every sheet as enlarging this pattern was not as exact a science as I would have liked. Just get each sheet lined up the best you can)
Secure with tape or glue as you go. I tend to just stick it in strategic places at this stage (in case I fluff it up and have to undo it) and go back over it afterwards with longer strips of tape. You should end up with something like this....
We've a couple of options at this stage.  I chose to cut mine out but you could trace the pieces onto new tissue/pattern paper.... I lined the waistlines up to check everything matched up ok...
Then I lined up the shoulders to check the neckline and armhole were matching up and curved smoothly...

It all looks passable to my somewhat untrained eye. Ready for the next stage of adding seam allowances and making the toile/muslin from calico which I shall hold off on until after the weekend. Give everyone a chance to get to this stage.

It's my first day back at college tomorrow after the Easter break and we have only 5 weeks left to complete our portfolios ready to submit for our qualifications. I have a seemingly huge amount still to do, but somehow it always seems to get done inbetween everything else! I'm sure it will be fine.
I've felt a bit as if the wheels have come off these last couple of weeks and that I've been scrabbling around frantically trying to keep up with everything I've taken on. Which is too much as usual, lol! But I think I'm back on track now, as long as I resist the urge to take on any more large and involved projects between now and the summer holidays! I really want to focus on this draftalong as it would be sooooo amazing to overcome the whole fitting thing. It's a big priority for me in terms of being able to take my sewing to the next level.
How about you guys? Do you find yourselves wanting to do so many different things that it all gets a bit blurry and manic from time to time?
Pxxx

11 comments :

  1. Looking good, I'm following along as you go but will wait till the end to try it, supposed to be doing the Crescent sewalong at the moment so can't commit to anything more! I'm very interested in the end product!

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  2. Stopping by to catch up on the draftalong posts I've missed out on the past few days (my computer is on the fritz!). After reading your other post about the sloper sizing, I'm thinking I'm going to have to tackle some grading over the weekend (or use a sloper I drafted last year, although I think it's a bit too fitted for the design I want to draft) when I have time. :) Thanks so much for including that information!

    I can totally relate to having too much on one's plate... I am pretty much in the same spot right now with projects, projects, projects! ;) I always do this though--so many projects to work on that are enticing! :D

    - Casey

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  3. That's exactly the word Casey! "Enticing"!! There's all these projects calling to you, saying "pick me, pick me,,,!" and you think to yourself, one more won't hurt. I can squeeze this into my schedule somewhere...;)
    Px

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  4. As I mentioned in my e-mail, I am doing some grading as well, though Casey's question has me wondering, is the sloper we are drafting for a fitted blouse or less so? Or, is it whatever we want it to be? (In which case, I'll have to do some thinking because I'm not sure what I want! :P ) I was also wondering, when we make our toiles/muslins, should we be using a calico? I was just going to use muslin, or even an old sheet, to make mine, figuring it was sort of a "practice" run and more tweaking would probably need to be made......As for being overscheduled, definitely! Some of it is due to projects, but most of it seems to just be trying to balance life and schooling my children. When they get a little older, it will probably be projects, projects, projects! :P

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  5. Thanks for all the time and effort you've put into these posts Portia. I'll be assembling my PDF this weekend! By the way, what's a sloper?! x

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  6. I know exactly how you feel, but you do a much better job of accomplishing things! I have lots of great plans, but I usually get overwhelmed and end up doing nothing. Your draftalong and the reasonable pace you're setting is really encouraging me to follow through. Thank you so much for squeezing us in!!

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  7. I'm actually thrilled we're resuming after the weekend.

    I can definitely relate to being busy. I love sew-alongs because I always learn so much, but I also always end up falling behind since I do not have time to sew everyday. With pattern drafting seeming like such a daunting task, taking it a bit slower seems like a great idea. :)

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  8. Hey Sheri, the block/sloper we are drafting is a base pattern drafted to our exact proportions,from which we can then create whatever style blouse we want by manipulating the pattern, changing it's proportions and adding design details around the basic "shell" that is the block/sloper. The block/sloper can be fitted like a second skin or a bit looser. I think it's really down to personal preference and how you intend to use your block/sloper afterwards. If you are likely to want to design and make tops that are fitted then I guess it would probably be easier to start with a block/sloper that's fitted to begin with.
    Calico is used alot for toiles/muslins because it's easy to work with with a nice even weave. You can mark it well with pen and chalk which makes it really good for marking and transferring alterations. Having said that, calico is not essential. You can use other fabrics but I'd make sure what you use is plain rather than patterned, not flimsy, and has an even weave.
    Pxxx

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  9. Jane, thankyou! You're welcome. A Sloper is the US term for what we call a Block in the UK. Namely a base pattern drafted to an individual's measurements and cut from stiff card. The carboard block/sloper is then traced around to create a duplicate pattern that is then slashed, spread, and generally played around with to create what ever design you want. Every time we want a new top, we'll be able to quickly trace round our block/sloper and voila! We'll have a bespoke base pattern to start from.
    Have fun with the PDF!
    Px

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  10. Sabrina & Ashley, thankyou, I try! I'm glad the pace is OK for you. (Though I don't think I could make it faster even if I wanted to, lol!)Nice to have you both along :)
    Px

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  11. Hello Portia, Yes, thank you for all the effort you're clearly putting into making this easy for us newbies! Timing's good for me too as I'm a bit behind but hope to catch up at the weekend. Can't wait!!!

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